Social Work (SW)

SW-200 Social Work Programs & Policies (4 credits)

This course is the gateway into the social work major. It is meant to provide students with an overview of the field of social work, including its history, values and ethics, theoretical frameworks, various practice areas, and philosophy of social work. Students will gain exposure to social work's role with cultural competency, social justice, social welfare, and social policy. The roles, practices, contributions, and perspectives that social work has with social welfare policy will be explored.

SW-220 Social Movements & Social Change (4 credits)

The student investigates formal and informal structures and processes in complex organizations. She develops skills in analyzing bureaucracies and in proposing and evaluating solutions to problems related to organizational environments. She also acquires communication, interaction, and decision-making skills that allow her to function effectively in organizational settings.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 2 Writing completed. BSC-215 or MGT 120/PCM 120 completed.

SW-250 Human Behavior in Social Environment (3 credits)

In this course, students will acquire knowledge and skills about the biological, sociological, psychological, cultural, and spiritual development throughout the lifespan, conception through elder years. Human development with the social environment emphasis from individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities perspectives and various theoretical frameworks. Students will apply core social work competencies.

SW-300 Social Work Practice Methods: Individuals (3 credits)

In this course, students will acquire knowledge and skills of the intervention level of individuals (micro) social work practice. These include client interviewing, evidence-based assessments, interpersonal skills, and documentation practices. Linkages will be made to families, groups, organizations, and communities. Students will apply core social work competencies within the context of practice with individuals.

Prerequisite(s): SSC-101 or SW-200 or PSY-110 completed.

SW-320 Families and Society (3 credits)

Offered Fall Term only. This course will examine the family, its structures, and functions. It will look at what families are, why they exist, and how they differ and change. In one respect this course is about your life as a family member: the experiences we all personally have had with family, good and bad, tend to affect what we bring to the study of this topic. In another respect, though, the course is about society's perspective of a family, and how we can understand them holistically. So, we will approach the family from the perspective of behavioral science: in particular, from the disciplines of social work, sociology, and related fields.

Prerequisite(s): One Communication Level 3 ICM, BSC-215, plus one additional 200-level course in PSY or SOC or SW completed. For SSH Majors: POL-225 or GLS-200 or BSC-255 completed. Offered Fall term only.

SW-325 Native American Service & Research (3 credits)

This service-learning, undergraduate research, and domestic travel course applies cultural competence, child development practices, applied theories, historical milestones, research techniques, and engagement methods to a field-based service experience. The students of this course implements a mutually-beneficial, educationally-based mentorship intervention with at-risk youth at a tribal school located on a reservation.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 3 ICM completed. Analysis Level 3 completed. Social Interaction Level 3 completed. Dev a Global Perspective Level 2 completed. Effective Citizenship Level 2 completed. Instructor approval required. $30 course fee is due with this course. You will be required to sign a financial agreement when paying the deposit; it identifies dates when fees are charged to you. The entire trip cost is non-refundable even if you drop the course and do not travel. Some of our classes will take place in an Alverno College classroom and others will be at the school with the youth. Attendance is required for these classes. When at the school, lunch will be provided. The school requires a background check. They will pay for it. Students must meet the school's requirements. This is a service-learning and undergraduate research course, which research says they are all very beneficial to foster a more successful student. College students will be a mentor or role model of the Today & Beyond Program: An Educationally-based Mentorship Intervention. College students will be considered a volunteer of Milwaukee Public Schools. So, college students can market this volunteer experience on their resume and graduate school applications. Textbook: Patty Loew; Indian Nations of Wisconsin - Histories of Endurance and Renewal; 2nd Edition; 2013.

SW-338 Program Evaluation (3 credits)

In this course, the student acquires an understanding of the systematic approach to program evaluation in nonprofit organizations, for-profit businesses, and governmental agencies. The course is designed to familiarize the student with key concepts and theories, practices, and uses of program evaluation in applied settings. Topics include reasons for and uses of program evaluation; types of evaluation, including needs assessment, process evaluation, and output evaluation; context of evaluation, planning, and design; ethical issues and evaluation standards; and reporting of evaluation results.

Prerequisite(s): CLD 220 or SOC-220 or POL-225 completed. HED Majors: BSC-255 & HED-210 completed.

SW-350 Special Topics in Social Work (1 credit)

This course allows students to explore in depth a topic featured in professional research and training in the field of social work and social services, such as those emphasized in the surrounding area of Milwaukee and the state of Wisconsin. Topics for the course will rotate according to assessments of need and based on feedback from the community, including the Social Work Advisory Council. Sample topics may include Trauma Informed Care, Child and Family Welfare, Violence against Women, Racial Social Justice, Death and Dying, and Health Care Services Access.

SW-350A Special Topics in Social Work (1 credit)

This course allows students to explore in depth a topic featured in professional research and training in the field of social work and social services, such as those emphasized in the surrounding area of Milwaukee and the state of Wisconsin. Topics for the course will rotate according to assessments of need and based on feedback from the community, including the Social Work Advisory Council. Sample topics may include Trauma Informed Care, Child and Family Welfare, Violence against Women, Racial Social Justice, Death and Dying, and Health Care Services Access.

Prerequisite(s): Course is offered workshop style and will meet 9/12/20, 9/19/20 & 10/3/20.

SW-350B Special Topics in Social Work (1 credit)

This course allows students to explore in depth a topic featured in professional research and training in the field of social work and social services, such as those emphasized in the surrounding area of Milwaukee and the state of Wisconsin. Topics for the course will rotate according to assessments of need and based on feedback from the community, including the Social Work Advisory Council. Sample topics may include Trauma Informed Care, Child and Family Welfare, Violence against Women, Racial Social Justice, Death and Dying, and Health Care Services Access.

Prerequisite(s): Course is offered workshop style and will meet 10/10/20, 10/24/20 & 11/7/20.

SW-350C Special Topics in Social Work (1 credit)

This course allows students to explore in depth a topic featured in professional research and training in the field of social work and social services, such as those emphasized in the surrounding area of Milwaukee and the state of Wisconsin. Topics for the course will rotate according to assessments of need and based on feedback from the community, including the Social Work Advisory Council. Sample topics may include Trauma Informed Care, Child and Family Welfare, Violence against Women, Racial Social Justice, Death and Dying, and Health Care Services Access.

Prerequisite(s): Course is offered workshop style.

SW-383 Social Work Field Education (2 credits)

This field education course is designed to provide the student with an opportunity to apply social work knowledge, skills, and values learned in the classroom to an approved community agency/organization. With this initial field education experience, students are to observe, interact, and assess cultural awareness and diversity of the individual clients, social work professionals, the organization/agency, and the surrounding community. Students are often supervised by an experienced social worker and by an academic social work faculty member. At placements were an experienced social worker is not present, a similar professional will be as well as the academic social work field coordinator will provide more direct supervision. Through this 2-credit course, students are expected to complete 150 hours at this agency/organization as well as attend regular campus meetings and complete academic assignments/assessments.

Prerequisite(s): PPS-229 completed. Consent by instructor needed., SW-300 completed or concurrent

SW-397 Independent Study (2.00 credits)

Under the approval and direction of a faculty member, independent study is available to students.

Prerequisite(s): 2020SP: Section 01: Preparation for and participation in the AHEC Interprofessional Case Competition. Registration only with instructor approval.

SW-398 Community Power & Change (3 credits)

This course introduces the student to the economics and politics of local and regional government decision making. She compares different structures of governance and planning in order to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of each. For example, communities include many different economic, cultural, and political interest groups. How well do various types of local and regional government address their diverse needs? The student examines case studies of local political issues and investigates issues in her own community.

Prerequisite(s): SSC-101 completed.

SW-399 Formal Introduction to Advanced Work (0 credits)

The Advanced-Level Event marks a significant accomplishment for each student as she proceeds into the work of her major department. When a department determines that a student is ready for advanced work within a discipline, the student is invited to participate in a ceremony that is both a celebration and an explanation of future requirements of the major and support areas. She registers for this experience at a point determined by her major department: for most majors the registration is connected to the taking of a particular course. Students and faculty gather for an afternoon during Mid-semester Assessment Days. Following a general program,students meet in departmental sessions with theirfaculty to discuss advanced outcomes, departmentcourses, advising procedures, and so on.

Prerequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment with first 300-level course in major

SW-400 Social Work Practice Methods: Groups & Family (3 credits)

Students will acquire knowledge and skills of the intervention level of groups/families (mezzo) social work practice. These include group stages and processes, group development, and family functioning with intervention strategies. Linkages will be made to individuals and communities/organizations. Students will apply core social work competencies.

Prerequisite(s): SSC-101 or SW-200 or PSY-110 completed. One Communication Level 3 ICM completed. Analysis Level 3 completed.

SW-450 Social Work Practice Methods: Communities & Organizations (3 credits)

In this course, students will acquire knowledge and skills of the intervention level of organizations and communities (macro) social work practice. These include advocacy, community needs assessments, coalitions, board of directors, leadership, supervision, fundraising, grant writing, and policy analysis. Linkages will be made to individuals and groups with families. Students will apply core social work competencies.

Prerequisite(s): SW-300 completed. One Communication-Level 3 ICM completed. Analysis-Level 3 completed. For Fall 2020: This is a hybrid course -- the three hour class will consist of two hours on campus and one hour online.

SW-483 Social Work Field Education (9 credits)

This Social Work Field Education course is designed to provide the student with an opportunity to apply social work knowledge, skills, and values learned in the classroom to an approved community agency/organization. This includes gained knowledge and values, practice and professional skills, exposure to evidence-based practice, and appreciation of the NASW Code of Ethics. Field Education is defined as a high impact practice and the pedagogical course for social work education. As students apply their academic course work to field based opportunities, they demonstrate and achieve the CSWE EPAS nine (9) competencies and associated behaviors and dimensions known as fundamental to baccalaureate social work. Students are supervised by both an experienced social worker and by an academic social work faculty member. The student is expected to learn a holistic and broad knowledge base of the agency/organization while practicing as a social worker in the agency/organization setting. Via this 9-credit course, students are expected to complete at the minimum 420 hours at their assigned agency/organization as well as attend regular campus meetings and complete academic assignments/assessments.

Prerequisite(s): PPS-229 and Intern-383 completed. Consent by instructor needed.

SW-490 Professional License (0 credits)

Optional course. For social work majors only. This course is to financially support students who wish to advance with the state social work licensure process, including taking the national exam. Students are to take this course during their final semester and while taking SW-483: Field Education (internship). This course, via its course fee, will help the student fund the social work licensure application fee and the fee to take the national exam for undergraduate social workers. This course is optional and it is not required for social work students. On the first day of classes, enrolled students can NOT drop the course and the fee is non-refundable. On the first day of classes, enrolled students will be responsible for the course fee, even if they decide not to apply for social work licensure and/or take the national social work exam. This course does NOT provide any guarantee that students will pass the national exam or be approved by the state for licensure. The student must use this fee prior to final assessment week. There are no classes, assignments, or assessments with this course. The intent of this course is to help financially support students with their professional goal of becoming a certified social worker.