Global Perspectives/ Effective Citizenship (GEC)

GEC-300 The Globally Effective Citizen (3 credits)

This series of courses engages the student in the richness and variety of life in this age of globalization by exploring local/national issues and analyzing them within the global context. Using the conceptual frameworks of political science, economics, the humanities, and global studies, she investigates politics and economics at home and abroad, the role of nongovernmental organizations in affecting global change, the historical and cultural context of issues, and the process of globalization and its impact. At the conclusion of a course in this series she integrates her knowledge in an external assessment.

GEC-302 Global Citizen:Power of Water (3 credits)

In this course students focus on the political and economic dimensions of water as a local and a global source of power, sustenance, and renewal. Students start with a history of water usage in the U.S., and look how the political process works in the U.S. on water issues. As the semester progresses we broaden our focus to look at other regions and their water issues. Students practice media awareness by keeping a "water log" of global water stories in the news. Water issues covered in this class mirror the water topics in which they may choose to research and present. These include: scarcity, pollution, water borne illnesses, irrigation, religious significance, sanitation, dam construction, privatization, and geo-political water issues. Students research and ultimately present to their peers on one of these issues, a region or country, and a non-governmental organization that works on the issue in the region.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 3 ICM completed. Analysis Level 3 completed. Social Interaction Level 3 completed. Dev a Global Perspective Level 2 completed. Effective Citizenship Level 2 completed.

GEC-303 Global Citizen: Crime & Punishment (3 credits)

In this class students explore criminal justice systems around the world to gain a better understanding of diverse ways that societies understand and respond to crime, and the laws, policies and institutions they have created to respond to criminal behavior. They learn the legal traditions that are the foundation for these laws and policies, and about the consequences of these approaches to criminal justice for the other aspects so society. Particular focus include policing, courts, and corrections within a variety of national contexts. They also explore issues with an international focus such as war crimes, genocide and terrorism. They discover the similarities and differences among national criminal justice systems, and recognize the ways in which crime and responses to crime have become an important feature of globalization. Ultimately they use this understanding as a basis for a critique of the criminal justice system in the United States, and to make recommendations for responding to crime locally, nationally and internationally.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 3 ICM completed. Analysis Level 3 completed. Social Interaction Level 3 completed. Dev a Global Perspective Level 2 completed. Effective Citizenship Level 2 completed.

GEC-304 Glbl Cit: Internationl Migration Issues (3 credits)

International migration has joined global economic trends, sustainable development, genocide and concerns about the environment as an important foreign policy issue. It has political, economic and social implications for "departure" and "destination" countries around the world. In this course students will explore the opportunities and threats posed by migration and how these are forcing attention to national and international policies regulating international migration. The United States can act unilaterally to protect its national interests, but at what point do the migration policies of other countries become the legitimate business of the U.S.? When should the poverty, civil strife, overpopulation, and environmental degradation that drive citizens from other countries become the concern of the U.S.? How can the U.S. intervene in the internal affairs of the fundamental element of the international system of states?

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 3 ICM completed. Analysis Level 3 completed. Social Interaction Level 3 completed. Dev a Global Perspective Level 2 completed. Effective Citizenship Level 2 completed.

GEC-305 Glbl Cit: Views on Aging/Local & Global (3 credits)

This course introduces students to the impact of public policy and of globalization on aging individuals and populations. Students begin with hands-on experience with an agency addressing aging issues, and explore how they are affected by public policy, as well as how they can influence public policy. Their textbook discusses the ways in which the process of globalization influences people around the world as they age, in terms of health, economic security, social intergrations, and quality of life. Students also learn how other societies conceptualize aging, and how different concepts of aging influence the framing of policy decisions. Many will select final projects that discuss how other societies' infrastructure with regard to aging can inform American policymaking.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 3 ICM completed. Analysis Level 3 completed. Social Interaction Level 3 completed. Dev a Global Perspective Level 2 completed. Effective Citizenship Level 2 completed.

GEC-306 Global Citizen: Gender Diversity (3 credits)

In this course, students explore the social construction of gender around the world. To gain a better understanding of the ways that societies understand and respond to gender, students examine the methods that societies use to encourage gender conformity and discourage gender non-conformity. After looking at these issues in the United States, each student chooses a country and researches how people operate within that country's gender system. Finally, students will articulate the human rights issues that are associated with efforts to control and limit expressions of gender diversity.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 3 ICM completed. Analysis Level 3 completed. Social Interaction Level 3 completed. Dev a Global Perspective Level 2 completed. Effective Citizenship Level 2 completed.

GEC-307 Global Art & Visual Culture (3 credits)

Students in this course will begin to learn how to interpret global art and its relationship to visual culture by examining their roles as consumers of the visual. They will investigate how geography is signified to create a sense of place, of belonging or unbelonging; how economic issues evolve in creation, distribution, and consumption of art or visual culture and how communities use civil discourse with non-governmental and governmental organizations to develop their cultural policies and projects. They will consider how these issues differ as they look at the arts and visual culture round the globe to uncover how visual instrumentation is developing as a local or global agenda.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 3 ICM completed. Analysis Level 3 completed. Social Interaction Level 3 completed. Dev a Global Perspective Level 2 completed. Effective Citizenship Level 2 completed.

GEC-308 Global Citizen: Psychology of Food (3 credits)

What do your cravings for French fries tell you about American culture? What is the significance of economic interests on food production in China? How did the Tsunami affect eating habits of the people in southeast Africa? Why do Mexicans eat tortillas while Indians eat chapatis? Who and what influences the production and distribution of rice in Japan? Why do Americans eat so many hamburger? If you are interested in these questions, this course will give you a foundation through which to explore the geography, politics, economics, and culture of food. It will begin with an examination of rice in Asia as a model through which to develop an understanding of the kind of research and exploration that is possible. Students will use this experience as a framework with which to explore the geography, politics, economics and culture of foods in different parts of the world and to research a Non-Governmental Organization related to the area they choose to investigate.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 3 ICM completed. Analysis Level 3 completed. Social Interaction Level 3 completed. Dev a Global Perspective Level 2 completed. Effective Citizenship Level 2 completed.

GEC-309 Global Citizen: Globalization (3 credits)

Students will study the growing phenomenon of jobs moving around the world in an increasingly boundary less and borderless global marketplace. Topics will include the economic, political, technological, regulatory, and social reasons for the globalization of labor, manufacturing, and the "knowledge economy", and its implications for the U.S. and other countries. Students will consider the experiences of other countries, from fully industrialized nations to developing countries, as they deal with global trade issues, to better understand how countries and governments confront the political and economic problems associated with the emerging global market. Exploring historical precedents (e.g. the British textile industry; the Irish Potato Famine; the huge influx of low-cost European labor into the U.S. from 1870-1910), students will develop the foundation to understand and explore the complexities and dichotomies of both sides of current political, economic and social issues and in turn to seek answers to questions perplexing our national, state and local leaders today - such as 'free trade vs.fair trade', and the 'outsourcing' and 'off shoring' of jobs. Students will explore the cost and the benefits to the U.S. and other countries of jobs moving globally to China, Mexico or India, for example. Students will explore alternative positions as to whether governments should attempt to address such issues and concerns with political social policy, and/or trade/tariff regulatory solutions or strategies, and what they might learn from history and the experiences of other countries in order to deal with such policy issues in what some in this country describe as Jobs, Trade and America's 'Other War'.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 3 ICM completed. Analysis Level 3 completed. Social Interaction Level 3 completed. Dev a Global Perspective Level 2 completed. Effective Citizenship Level 2 completed.

GEC-310 Global Citizen: Global Feminism (3 credits)

This course examines the political, social and economic issues affecting the status of women in the United States and abroad from a theoretical perspective in order to develop strategies for change.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 3 ICM completed. Analysis Level 3 completed. Social Interaction Level 3 completed. Dev a Global Perspective Level 2 completed. Effective Citizenship Level 2 completed.

GEC-311 Global Citizen: Understanding Terrorism (3 credits)

In this course, students focus on the political, economic, religious, and social roots of terrorism in an attempt to offer answers to some key questions: How do these factors contribute to terrorism and political violence? What actions constitute terrorism? What is new about the new wave of terrorism as distinct from previous actions? What are the relationships between terrorism and the media? An important goal of the course is to evaluate how policy makers respond to terrorism and the consequences of those responses. What are some alternate approaches to terrorism? For their final project, students conduct research on the perspective and goals of an international non-governmental organization concerned about terrorism and ways to prevent such violence.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 3 ICM completed. Analysis Level 3 completed. Social Interaction Level 3 completed. Dev a Global Perspective Level 2 completed. Effective Citizenship Level 2 completed.

GEC-312 Global Citizen: End of Nature (3 credits)

Save the Whales"; "Think Globally, Act Locally"; "Hug a Tree"; "Deep Ecology";"Earth First!" These slogans, movements, and organizations enjoyed varying degrees of popularity in recent decades. In fact, a much longer list of issues could be included. Global Climate change represents just one of the ongoing challenges to scientists and citizens alike. Even 100 years ago, calls for scientific expertise drove U.S. government involvement in resource managment. Today, what scientists have learned about the natural world seems to exceed the wildest dreams of experts a century ago, and yet we have greater concerns than ever about our inability to plan for the future. Around the world, countries are developing at rates that may soon exceed the impact on nature of even the American economy. In this course, students will understand the challenges of the past alongside international comparisons. These challenges are unique products of different historical and cultural contexts, and they serve as instructive examples of the parallels in human experience. Students will view, through the perspectives of various non-governmental organizations, the geographic, political, and economic opportunities and challenges related to climate in our global future.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 3 ICM completed. Analysis Level 3 completed. Social Interaction Level 3 completed. Dev a Global Perspective Level 2 completed. Effective Citizenship Level 2 completed.

GEC-313 Global Citizen: Christianity/Div World (3 credits)

Fact: Most Christians in the world are not of European descent. This fact must be understood in political, geographic and economic context. Student research projects may anaalyze indigenization of religious practices (e.g. adapting worship to a people's native culture), religious violence and peacemaking, the future of missions, response to political repression, literacy and economic development, or other topics relevant to the understanding of Christianity in a global perspective.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 3 ICM completed. Analysis Level 3 completed. Social Interaction Level 3 completed. Dev a Global Perspective Level 2 completed. Effective Citizenship Level 2 completed.

GEC-314 Global Citizen: Indigenous People (3 credits)

To many of us, a world with shrinking borders is simply a metaphor to clarify our experience with instant communication and rapid travel. For indigenous people, the process of globalization is experienced more acutely and with profound ramifications. This course examines the juxtaposition of our world with the world inhabited by indigenous people. As the First People, they have experiences and traditions that reach beyond recorded time. Yet they are forced to live in and adjust to a world that best ignores and at worst destroys their way of life. We will examine this relationship through historical, political, geographical, cultural and environmental contexts. We will learn from and about indigenous people of the Arctic Circle, the Amazon basin, from Africa, Asia, and Latin America. We will connect with organizations that fight to preserve indigenous rights. We will study how the media portrays their stories. And in the process of discovering the hidden voices of our global elders, we will learn what it takes to become informed, educated, and active citizens of the world.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 3 ICM completed. Analysis Level 3 completed. Social Interaction Level 3 completed. Dev a Global Perspective Level 2 completed. Effective Citizenship Level 2 completed.

GEC-316 Global Citizen: Power & Prejudice (3 credits)

When two sides of an interaction have unequal power and status, the nature of the interaction and the perceived results are affected by this differential. In this class, we will examine the way power can disrupt communication and cooperation. We will begin with how power affects relations between individuals, and then discuss consequences of intergroup and international differences in power and status.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 3 ICM completed. Analysis Level 3 completed. Social Interaction Level 3 completed. Dev a Global Perspective Level 2 completed. Effective Citizenship Level 2 completed.

GEC-317 Global Citizen: Religion & Politics (3 credits)

This course will investigate the historic patterns and current interactions of religious organizations and governments. Students will gain a better understanding of the rationales used for or against religious involvement in politics. The course will focus on the overlap, interplay, and tensions between religion and domestic politics in both Christian and Islamic societies in an attempt to answer the question: what is the proper role of religion in public life?

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 3 ICM completed. Analysis Level 3 completed. Social Interaction Level 3 completed. Dev a Global Perspective Level 2 completed. Effective Citizenship Level 2 completed.

GEC-318 Global Citizen: Women & the Economy (3 credits)

This course provides the theoretical background needed for the analysis of the data and the debates concerning men's and women's economic behaviors and experiences in terms of such variables as the division of labor, the labor force, participation rate, and the wage differential between women and men. In the context of economic history, specific economic issues facing women workers are examined and the merits of different economic theories and their policy prescriptions are debated.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 3 ICM completed. Analysis Level 3 completed. Social Interaction Level 3 completed. Dev a Global Perspective Level 2 completed. Effective Citizenship Level 2 completed.

GEC-319 Global Citizen: Women's Agency (3 credits)

U.S. women now earn more college degrees than men and almost half of all women work outside the home. If women have access to education and careers, how is it that U.S. women earn less than men for the same work and account for less than ? of elected officials? Lack of economic and political gender parity affects society in myriad ways which limit women?s agency over their own lives and that of their communities. Students will explore questions of social status, economic determination, access to education and political representation of women throughout the world. Students will also research the work of international women?s organizations and explore connections to their own lives.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 3 ICM completed. Analysis Level 3 completed. Social Interaction Level 3 completed. Dev a Global Perspective Level 2 completed. Effective Citizenship Level 2 completed.

GEC-320 Global Citizen Israel-Palestine Conflict (3 credits)

This course examines the conflict in Israel-Palestine from a global perspective, considering international law, human rights, religious and historical claims and grievances, and many other issues, as well as the roles played by regional and foreign governments (including, especially, the US government), NGOs, activists, and others. Sources range from legal texts to personal testimony, fiction writing, and movies representing different perspectives on the conflict.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 3 ICM completed. Analysis Level 3 completed. Social Interaction Level 3 completed. Dev a Global Perspective Level 2 completed. Effective Citizenship Level 2 completed.

GEC-321 Glbl Cit: Modern Africa Devlpmt& Society (3 credits)

This course will examine modern Africa from the perspective of development, discussing how citizens of Western societies (especially the US) can best assist African societies and individuals in solving the problems facing them and embracing their full potential. Topics of study may include: the diversity and vibrancy of African societies and cultures; the pitfalls of stereotyping Africa as a continent of poverty and strife; the influence of historical, political, economic, and cultural forces such as colonialism and the global economic system on Africa's situation; the central role of African governments and individuals in defining development efforts; and the various channels through which we in the US can offer assistance.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 3 ICM completed. Analysis Level 3 completed. Social Interaction Level 3 completed. Dev a Global Perspective Level 2 completed. Effective Citizenship Level 2 completed.

GEC-322 Glbl Ct: Access to Ed: Women Around Wrld (3 credits)

In this course, students explore education systems around the world to gain a better understanding of diverse ways that societies understand and respond to educating girls and women; students explore the laws, policies, and institutions that shape, supervise, and, on occasion, sabotage women's access to education around the world. They learn the cultural traditions that are the foundations for these laws, policies, and institutions, and they consider the various societal and international consequences of these approaches to educating girls and women. The class also explores education-related issues with an international focus, such as how education services are structured and delivered by various international aid agencies and non-governmental organizations. They discover the similarities and differences among national education systems, and recognize the ways in which education and varying practices for education have become an important part of the conversations related to globalization.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 3 ICM completed. Analysis Level 3 completed. Social Interaction Level 3 completed. Dev a Global Perspective Level 2 completed. Effective Citizenship Level 2 completed.

GEC-323 Glbl Ct: Am Civil Rights Mvmnt 1954-65 (3 credits)

This course will cover the American Civil Rights Movement from 1954 to 1965 in the South. The principal focus will be on the nature of the oppressive Jim Crow system in the South and black protest against it. In examining the Jim Crow system, students will study its economic, political, and social supports. Students will also study the philosophical justifications for the system and the variety of white opinions concerning Jim Crow, including segregationists, racial moderates, and white supporters of the civil rights movement. In examining the black protest, students will study the variety of black ideas, from the national leaders of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the ministers of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, and the students of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. Students will also study the philosophy and practice of nonviolence and how it was applied in the American South. In addition, students will study the white reactions to the protest and the two principal laws that were written as a result of the protest: the 1964 Civil Rights Act and the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 3 ICM completed. Analysis Level 3 completed. Social Interaction Level 3 completed. Dev a Global Perspective Level 2 completed. Effective Citizenship Level 2 completed.

GEC-324 Global Citizen: Coastal Cities (3 credits)

The aim of the Coastal Cities project is to use Milwaukee as a model for comparing other coastal cities. We will be investigating how the cities are influenced by their position on the water and in turn how the cities impact the body of water. We will use a multi-disciplinary approach, studying how the city and water interact environmentally, economically, physically and culturally.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 3 ICM completed. Analysis Level 3 completed. Social Interaction Level 3 completed. Dev a Global Perspective Level 2 completed. Effective Citizenship Level 2 completed.

GEC-325 Glbl Ct: Internatl Nat Dis-Econ Aftersh (3 credits)

In this class, students explore the economic, social and political aftershocks of domestic and international natural disasters. In this course, students develop their analytic, problem solving and critical thinking abilities by learning and applying basic theories, concepts and frameworks of microeconomics in rebuilding communities affected by national and international natural disasters. During the past ten years, natural disasters such as earthquakes (December 26, 2004 9.1 earthquake Indian Ocean and August 11, 2011 9.2 earthquake Rikuzentakata, Japan for example), tsunamis (December 26, 2004 Aceh, Indonesia pummeling eleven countries, for example), hurricanes (Fay, Gustav, Hanna, Ike and Katrina for example), cyclones, typhoons, wildfires and landslides have impacted the United States and the world. Students will discover conflicting schools of thought regarding economic aftershocks and the rebuilding of communities. On the one hand, many economists believe the aftershocks of a natural disaster could lead to an economic slowdown and a decline in economic growth. On the other hand, many economists believe that while the loss of life is tragic, research has shown that natural disasters offer many hidden benefits to the nation's and the world's economy and one could expect continued economic growth. Finally, students will discover through the lens of various non-governmental organizations, how national and international natural disasters provide economic, social and political aftershocks, challenges and opportunities to the U.S. and global economy, the U.S. and global markets and the consumer.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 3 ICM completed. Analysis Level 3 completed. Social Interaction Level 3 completed. Dev a Global Perspective Level 2 completed. Effective Citizenship Level 2 completed.

GEC-327 Glbl Ct: Healthy Minds? Mental Illness (3 credits)

In this course, we will explore the influence of factors, such as culture, society, media, racism, religion, politics, and economics on mental health and illness beliefs, practices, and services. In addition, the historical roots of mental health and illness, both nationally and internationally, will be traced. Also, we will connect with global organizations that advocate for the health and safety of those afflicted with mental illness and how we, as individual citizens, can support social justice for the mentally ill.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 3 ICM completed. Analysis Level 3 completed. Social Interaction Level 3 completed. Dev a Global Perspective Level 2 completed. Effective Citizenship Level 2 completed.

GEC-328 Glbl Ct: Migration & Multicult in Europe (3 credits)

Migration and Multiculturalism in Europe Students will use frameworks from both the Developing a Global Perspectives and Effective Citizenship abilities to explore a range of topics related to recent influxes into Europe of refugees and others fleeing persecution, war, violence, disease, and poverty. They will research non-governmental organizations working with refugee and migrant populations in Europe in order to assess their contributions and effectiveness. Topics will include the history of previous migrations into and within Europe; causes behind recent refugee and migrant flows; the legal status of different migrants under international and national law; attitudes and policies towards migrants in European host societies; and the experiences of the migrants themselves, including their artistic and cultural production.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 3 ICM completed. Analysis Level 3 completed. Social Interaction Level 3 completed. Dev a Global Perspective Level 2 completed. Effective Citizenship Level 2 completed.

GEC-329 Glbl Ct: Presidentl Election & Terrorism (3 credits)

The course will focus on the American presidential election in the context of global terrorism. Students will study the rise of ISIS, terrorism in Europe, and terrorism in the United States, with particular emphasis on the effect of terrorism on the choice of a president in 2016.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 3 ICM completed. Analysis Level 3 completed. Social Interaction Level 3 completed. Dev a Global Perspective Level 2 completed. Effective Citizenship Level 2 completed.

GEC-330 Glbl Ct: Cultural Persp Health: Jamaica (3 credits)

Through in-depth study of the Jamaican culture, the student gains experience in assessing cultural health-care practices, shared belief systems, and norms. She experiences the relationship between culture and health and begins to expand her cultural competence abilities to enhance her practice of professional nursing. The course concludes with an immersion experience(approximately 10-14 days), during which she observes health-care delivery systems operating in acute, clinic, and community care sites. She participates in care and determines the impact of the host culture's health-care delivery system in meeting people's needs within the cachement/service area.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 3 ICM completed. Analysis Level 3 completed. Social Interaction Level 3 completed. Dev a Global Perspective Level 2 completed. Effective Citizenship Level 2 completed.

GEC-397 Independent Study (3 credits)

Under the approval and direction of a faculty member, independent study is available to students.