Humanities (HUM)

HUM-150 Express/Interpretn Human Experience (4 credits)

In this course, the student explores the basic human value questions that artistic works address and that also find expression in related humanistic works of history, religious studies and philosophy. She is introduced to the processes of the various humanities disciplines as ways of approaching human experience.

HUM-150A Fairytales in Fiction & Film (4 credits)

In this section of HUM-150, we will study fairy tales as literary texts and as cultural artifacts. In the first half of the course, we will read classic fairy tales from French, German, and British traditions. We will read various versions of each classic fairy tale, using close reading strategies to identify literary elements such as plot, character, setting, and symbol. We also will apply theoretical approaches to fairy tales, including psychoanalytical, feminist, historical, and religious perspectives. In the second part of the class, we will look at the presence of fairy tales in American, European, and World literature and popular culture. We will read stories and novels that are contemporary re-workings of classic fairy tales, view movies that incorporate fairy tale motifs, and explore fairy tales from other cultural traditions.

HUM-150B Growing Up Latino/A (4 credits)

In this course, the student explores the basic human value questions that artistic works address and that also find expression in related humanistic works of history, religious studies and philosophy. She is introduced to the processes of the various humanities disciplines as ways of approaching human experience.

HUM-150C Identity & Culture in Literature (4 credits)

In this course, the student explores the basic human value questions that artistic works address and that also find expression in related humanistic works of history, religious studies and philosophy. She is introduced to the processes of the various humanities disciplines as ways of approaching human experience.

HUM-150D Making War, Making Peace (4 credits)

In this course, we will examine the causes and consequences of violence in two societies - Northern Ireland and Guatemala - through the disciplinary lenses of philosophy, literature, history and religious studies. Together we will consider how wars come about, and how peace is restored to societies at war, the relation between injustice and violence, and the choices made by individuals and groups to make war or to make peace. In exploring these issues, we will read and discuss works of history, literature, philosophy and religious studies, and watch films and experience works of art.

HUM-150E Religion & Identity (4 credits)

In this course, the student explores the basic human value questions that artistic works address and that also find expression in related humanistic works of history, religious studies and philosophy. She is introduced to the processes of the various humanities disciplines as ways of approaching human experience.

HUM-150F Screening America (4 credits)

In this course, the student explores the basic human value questions that artistic works address and that also find expression in related humanistic works of history, religious studies and philosophy. She is introduced to the processes of the various humanities disciplines as ways of approaching human experience.

HUM-150G Spirituality & Society (4 credits)

This course explores the major facets of the field of "Humanities"-Religious Studies, Philosophy, History, and Literature-with a special focus on spirituality, i.e. the experience of the sacred or "numinous" in literature, poetry, art, film and personal reflection. Being human in essence means being "spiritual," in that each person has a unique character, vision, point of view, ethical and moral vision, and beliefs about her experience and the world around her. Through individual and group work, you will explore and analyze diverse ways in which spirituality is expressed in different religious traditions, cultural, social and historical contexts, and the values, literary and artistic traditions associated with them. Through religion, literature, film, and poetry, and engaging in analysis and reflection, writing, and discussion, you will discover various worldviews, and develop your understanding of what it means to be "human."

Prerequisite(s): Section only open to students invited by faculty.

HUM-150H Survival Themes in Literature & Film (4 credits)

In this course we explore what it means to survive and thrive physically, psychologically, and culturally in a rapidly changing world. Using novels, memoir, and film, we open up questions about the values people develop in times of crisis and the implications of their choices. We learn and apply the humanities frameworks of history, literature, philosophy, and religious students to deepen analysis of the course texts A thematic strand running through the course is the way art assists individuals and communities to retain hope in the face of obstacles and challenges. Students develop their own survival frameworks after reading and responding to other's stories.

HUM-150I Understanding Place: Milwaukee (4 credits)

This course explores places, especially cities like Milwaukee, through reading, course work and outings. We will come to new understandings of "place" and how place is created. For example, history helps us better understand "place" by analyzing the events that have created the built environment of the city or to make distinctions between the ways that people of different historical times experienced the city; the study of literature, poetry and film will enable us to comprehend the values and visions of different peoples through their art works about place; and philosophy and religious studies will help us ask questions about the nature of commonly held assumptions about places, how we as a human community want to live in places together, and the social, economic, gendered and racial/ethnic characteristics and meanings of places. Together these disciplines can give us a better view of the meaning of our own lives and the world we experience. They help us understand our individual points of view and the views of others. Because this is a course about the city, you will frequently travel to various places throughout the city as you develop a new understanding of places like Milwaukee. Additional course fee required for off campus excursions.

HUM-150J Women in Muslim Societies (4 credits)

In this course, we will examine the place of women in Muslim-majority societies, beginning with scriptural and cultural tradition, and moving through the history of women in Islam to come to recent and contemporary contexts for the bulk of the course. We will carefully examine portrayals of Muslim women's experiences in fiction, poetry, essays, and cinema, both by Muslim women themselves and occasionally by Muslim men and by non-Muslims. Of particular interest will be the question of whether Islam is fundamentally patriarchal, and whether there can be such a thing as "Islamic feminism." We will also discuss how the patriarchal structures that undeniably exist in Islamic societies affect women's lives in different social, political, and geographical contexts. We will focus primarily on women in the Middle East, but will also look at women in other Muslim societies such as Senegal, Malaysia, and Indonesia, as well as Muslim minority women in Western societies. We will also hear from guest speakers from local Muslim communities.

HUM-150K Rebels Wih A Cause (4 credits)

In this course, the student explores the basic human value questions that artistic works address and that also find expression in related humanistic works of history, religious studies and philosophy. She is introduced to the processes of the various humanities disciplines as ways of approaching human experience.

HUM-150L The Future in Film & Fiction (4 credits)

You'll time travel to the future in this section of HUM-150. Through a variety of current novels and films, you'll explore the ways writers and filmmakers have imagined the future. You'll travel to worlds controlled by computers, to societies in the grip of dangerous demagogues, to communities stifled by repressive bureaucracies, and as you journey you'll bear witness to the struggles of individual men and women confronting what it means to be human. At the end of our journey, you'll imagine your own future.

HUM-150M Religion and Culture (4 credits)

In this course, Religion and Culture, we will explore how people in various cultures create their points of view and make life meaningful. We will do this, primarily, through the discipline of Religious Studies, with the help of History, Philosophy, English and the arts. Our sojourn into cultural religious worldviews will be aided through reading novels and watching films. This study into religion and cultures will also help us understand our own quest for a meaningful existence and the historical, philosophical, and artistic dynamics that are important dimensions of our humanity.

HUM-150N Women Growing Up in Literature & Film (4 credits)

Reading and watching women's coming of age stories offers a perfect window into the rich variety of global cultures both in and outside of US borders. In this course you will read fiction and autobiography, and, when possible, compare them with the film versions-- such as with The Joy Luck Club and The Secret Life of Bees. We will also watch ground-breaking global films such as Wadjda about a girl's quest to own a bicycle in contemporary Saudi Arabia and El Norte, about a brother and sister attempting to flee persecution in Guatemala and establish a new life in the U.S. Analyzing and responding to these readings and films from various perspectives in the Humanities will allow for a full exploration of what coming of age means for yourself and for others in different historical and cultural circumstances.

HUM-150O Migration & Immigration in Am Experience (4 credits)

The image of the immigrant is as American as baseball, hot dogs, and apple pie. Yet the stories of people who venture out in search of a better life are rarely as simple as a Chevrolet commercial. In this course we will consider fictional and non-fiction accounts in literature and film, using the perspectives of the humanities disciplines to help us understand what people learn about themselves and their world in the process of traveling across the country or across the ocean. Reflecting on these varied voices and experiences will lead us to consider how we understand ourselves and our own world view. Required texts: Maya Angelou, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings; Frank McCourt, Angela's Ashes; and Amy Tan, The Joy Luck Club.

HUM-150P Screening America (4 credits)

In this course we explore the United States in the twentieth century through a critical analysis of popular movies. Films have a powerful influence on how we remember events and how we see and react to differences among peoples. We will also learn how films do this, for to be informed citizens today, we not only need to know that these "moving stories" influence our knowledge, our decisions, even our hopes and fears, we also need to understand how they are doing this. To do both, to know and to understand why we know, we will learn how to apply four disciplinary ways of knowing of history, English, religious studies, and philosophy, while practicing key abilities of analysis, valuing in decision making, developing a global perspective, and aesthetic engagement.

HUM-150Q Perspectives on Freedom (4 credits)

- In this course we will explore concepts relating to freedom using the tools of the humanities disciplines of History, English, Religious Studies and Philosophy. We will consider concepts such as political freedom, individual rights, mythology, intellectual and spiritual and religious freedom, and the internal and external factors that have helped to shape our ideas of freedom. In this process, the student will develop her intellectual abilities and consider the role and value of concepts of freedom in her own life. We will engage a variety of texts such as literature, film and essays.

HUM-150R Memory & Images in the Civil War (4 credits)

This class explores the meaning of the American Civil War for both our past and our present worlds in order to construct our own response to the question, "what is true?" By studying both historical and fictional works on the period, through the viewing of film and photographs, by listening to music of then and now and interpreting artwork from the era, we will consider ways the war era influences our memory and imagination. We hope to understand, in the words of Abraham Lincoln, "the mystic chords of memory" that bind us together as Americans as we face a new set of challenges at start of the 21st Century.

HUM-297 Independent Study (3 credits)

Under the approval and direction of a faculty member, independent study is available to students.

HUM-343 Language & Writing: Creative Writing (3 credits)

This course deals with all forms of creative writing: fiction, poetry, humorous essays, journals. The student is encouraged to experiment with a wide range of genres for a variety of audiences. In the process she works to develop a sense of her own unique voice and style as a writer.

Prerequisite(s): One Communication Level 4 ICM completed. EN-251 recommended for CSW Supports.

HUM-344 Great Films (3 credits)

This course will address the topics of film genre and film history from a case study approach. Students will learn about film history, including technical innovation and critical reception, by studying certain key films that have been deemed "great." Explorations of these films will include analysis of film elements and a consideration of film history and criticism and Hollywood genre studies, including an examination of the Historical Epic, the Independent Film, film noir, the Western, and the Romance. Students will construct their own critical framework for "greatness" and analyze these films from a number of different theoretical or critical perspectives including, of course, their own evolving personal responses. The final individual and group project will involve a consideration of a recent "updated" version of a specific Hollywood genre with an understanding of genre conventions, revision, homage, parody, and experimentation. For example: analyzing Unforgiven (1992) or Django Unchained (2012) in light of the conventions of the Western. All films will be seen in class.

Prerequisite(s): One Communication Level 4 ICM completed.

HUM-350 Alternate World Views (4 credits)

In this series of courses, the student has the opportunity to reflect on her conceptions of herself, her culture, and the world. Through her study of another world culture and civilization, she explores values and belief systems that may be very different from her own. She engages in intense reading and discussion of indigenous literature, history, and thought.

Prerequisite(s): Two HFA-210 courses completed and one Communication Level 4 ICM

HUM-351 Chinese Civilization & Cultures (4 credits)

In this series of courses, the student has the opportunity to reflect on her conceptions of herself, her culture, and the world. Through her study of another world culture and civilization, she explores values and belief systems that may be different from her own. She engages in intense reading and discussion of indigenous literature, history, and thought.

Prerequisite(s): One HFA-310 completed; One Communication Level 4 ICM completed.

HUM-352 South Asia Civilization (4 credits)

In this series of courses, the student has the opportunity to reflect on her conceptions of herself, her culture, and the world. Through her study of another world culture and civilization, she explores values and belief systems that may be very different from her own. She engages in intense reading and discussion of indigenous literature, history, and thought.

Prerequisite(s): Two HFA-310 completed; Communications Level 4 ICM completed. Addtional Information: Summer 2014: Meets May 31, June 14, 28, July 12, 26 & Aug 2

HUM-353 Latin American Civilizations (4 credits)

In this series of courses, the student has the opportunity to reflect on her conceptions of herself, her culture, and the world. Through her study of another world culture and civilization, she explores values and belief systems that may be very different from her own. She engages in intense reading and discussion of indigenous literature, history, and thought.

Prerequisite(s): One HFA-310 or HFA-250 completed; Communication Level 4 ICM completed.

HUM-355 Japan: Studies in Civilizations& Culture (4 credits)

In this series of courses, the student has the opportunity to reflect on her conceptions of herself, her culture, and the world. Through her study of another world culture and civilization, she explores values and belief systems that may be very different from her own. She engages in intense reading and discussion of indigenous literature, history, and thought.

Prerequisite(s): One HFA-310 completed; Communication Level 4 ICM completed.

HUM-356 Latin American Civilizations-In Spanish (4 credits)

This course is taught in Spanish. In this series reflect on her conceptions of herself, her culture, and the world. Through her study of another world culture and civilization, she explores values and belief systems that may be very different from her own. She engages in intense reading and discussion of indigenous literature, history, and thought.

Prerequisite(s): Course taught in Spanish and fulfills one SLC capstone requirement. SLC-303 completed or waived per SLC-100 Language Placement Assessment. This course requires 8-12 hours of service learning in the community.

HUM-357 The Two Koreas (4 credits)

In this series of courses, the student has the opportunity to reflect on her conceptions of herself, her culture, and the world. Through her study of another world culture and civilization, she explores values and belief systems that may be very different from her own. She engages in intense reading and discussion of indigenous literature, history, and thought.

Prerequisite(s): One HFA-310 completed; Communications Level 4 ICM completed.

HUM-358 Middle Eastern Civilization (4 credits)

The Middle East is often referred to as "the cradle of civilization," but is today better known in the West as a place of religious, political, ethnic, and economic strife. In this class, we will ask how the homeland of the three Abrahamic religions came to be seen as such a violent region, discuss whether this characterization is in fact justified, in history or in the present, and analyze the role of factors such as Western intervention in the region, Islam, and oil wealth in shaping both events and Western perceptions of those events. We will look at how the inhabitants of the Middle East-men and women, powerful and powerless, Muslims, Jews, Christians and others-have experienced their recent history, how they have attempted to shape it, and how these experiences have affected their view of the world. This course will use history as an organizing principle, but will integrate the other Humanities disciplines as well. Students will develop their understanding of the region via the study of novels, poetry, film, art, music, and philosophical and religious texts as well as more traditional historical sources. Overemphasis on the political and military aspects of the region's history is precisely what has bred the image of the region as war-torn and unstable; empathetically investigating cultural output, along with a balanced historiography, will give students a more authentic and human understanding of the region and its peoples.

Prerequisite(s): One HFA-310 or HFA-250 completed; One Communication Level 4 ICM completed.

HUM-360 Themes in Humanities Course (4 credits)

No description available.

HUM-362 Genre Studies: Reading & Writing Memoir (3 credits)

Students explore this genre by reading a variety of literary memoirs and by experimenting with their own autobiographical writing. They reflect philosophically on what creates meaning in their lives by interpreting and constructing life stories. Questions of identity, memory, truth(s), creativity, and legacy are the heart of the course. Awareness of metaphor and application of formalist, reader response, feminist, psychoanalytical, and ethnic literary approaches enhance student's ability to respond to contemporary and historical texts. Faculty and peer feedback guide student's revisions of their narratives, sharpening their sensitivity to language and other aspects of the form and content of memoir.

Prerequisite(s): One Communication Level 4 ICM completed.

HUM-364 Confronting the Holocaust (3 credits)

This course engages the student in a complex series of questions about human nature as she examines the circumstances and conditions that led to the Holocaust. Through an examination of historical, religious, literary, and philosophical texts (including film; eyewitness testimony; sociological, existential, and historical works; poetry; and theology), the student develops a comprehensive approach to the material in order to construct a meaningful, informed personal response to the subject. She explores how individuals create meaning in the face of unimaginable horrors as well as the implications of such study on one's responsibility to society and others.

Prerequisite(s): WEC: LA 321; WDC: One HFA-310 completed.

HUM-370 Studies of Cultures Series (3 credits)

No description available.

HUM-371 Stds-Cultures:The 20s in American Lit (3 credits)

This course examines the literary achievement of the Harlem Renaissance and Americans abroad. While evidence of the angst and artistic experimentation associated with modernism can be found in both literary movements, African-American writers of the Harlem Renaissance differed from Americans in Europe in their desire to draw from their distinctive historical and cultural traditions as a means of affirmation and empowerment. The student uses critical frameworks to analyze, evaluate, and place in context the literary works she studies. She also analyzes how the ideas, asthetic principles, and values of the literary works challenge or reinforce her own values and thinking about life and art.

Prerequisite(s): One Communication Level 4 ICM completed.

HUM-380 Contemporary America Course (3 credits)

No description available.

HUM-392 Cross Cultural Exploration: Women& Words (3 credits)

The student examines the relationship between language and culture in the context of how language affects woman's perspective of herself and others. She examines works from a variety of cultures that introduce such questions as: How does language affect our understanding of our relationship to our own culture? What is the role of language formation in the development of self? In the formation of gender identity? How does our understanding of language affect our understanding of other cultures?

Prerequisite(s): One HFA-310 and Communication Level 4 ICM completed, or LA 321 completed.

HUM-396 Cross-Cultural Explor: Ecology & Spirit (3 credits)

In this course the student explores a variety of ecological issues and relates them to selected religious traditions and to currents in contemporary thought. This complex analysis is organized by three themes: respect for the earth and environmental ethics, economics and lifestyle questions, and the relationship between day-to-day living and a quest for the divine. The course concentrates on the Judeo-Christian tradition, including concepts of creation, incarnation, and sacramentally, while incorporating insights and approaches from other traditions.

Prerequisite(s): One HFA-310 completed and one Communication Level 4 ICM completed, or LA 321 completed.

HUM-397 Independent Study (2 credits)

Under the approval and direction of a faculty member, independent study is available to students.

HUM-398 Cross-Clt Exp: Film Around the World (3 credits)

In this introduction to formal film studies, the student analyzes the narrative structure and visual elements of film, studying films from India, Japan, Europe, Africa, and South America as well as from the United States. She independently applies theories and frameworks from the humanities to organize and articulate her aesthetic responses to those films, and articulates her own personal vision of the genre of film.

Prerequisite(s): One HFA-310 or LA 321 completed.

HUM-410 Senior Humanities Seminar (4 credits)

Offered Spring Term only. The student explores fundamental issues in the arts and humanities. She articulates a personal credo regarding the place of the arts and humanities in her life. This involves bringing the methodologies and skills of individual humanistic disciplines to bear on larger interdisciplinary questions and issues.

Prerequisite(s): HUM-350 series course completed.Offered Spring Term only.

HUM-497 Independent Study (2 credits)

Under the approval and direction of a faculty member, independent study is available to students.