English (EN)

EN-210 Perspectives on Literature (2 credits)

The student concentrates on a specific literary genre and examines the way in which a chosen perspective can affect her response to fiction, drama, poetry, or essay. These perspectives are based on common literary concepts. She analyzes literature as communication - the special links and frequent obstacles between writer and reader. She investigates literature as a formal organization - the writing of a work based on how the elements are crafted into a meaningful whole. She considers literature as representation - the relationship between art and life as the artist explores various concepts of reality.

Prerequisite(s): FA-110 or LA-230 completed. HUM-150 completed, CM-125 completed. Or LA 222 or LA 223 completed

EN-211 The Graphic Novel (2 credits)

The graphic novel is a fast-growing genre, and is extremely popular with young people around the world. In this class, students will review the history of the graphic novel, tracing the development of graphic novels as they have evolved and developed new techniques for expression. Graphic novels are a hybrid art form, cmbining drawing with text, pictures with words. They combine literary and visual narratives in immensely appealing and creative ways.

Prerequisite(s): FA-110 or LA-230 completed; HUM-150 completed; CM-125 completed. Or LA 222 or LA 223 completed. Preference given to students required to take this course if enrollment exceeds limit.

EN-250 Oprah's Books (4 credits)

Students become readers in Alverno's Oprah's Book Club, developing as a literary critic and examining the economic, cultural and political implications of Oprah's Book Club choices. They take the risks and accept the responsibilities for their critical judgment of each of the works represented in the course, and they will examine in some depth Oprah's contributions to literacy and to literary culture, including exploring the controversies and the challenges surrounding her book club. As students decide whether or not a work is worthy of Oprah's pick they will fine tune their own definitions of what makes a book good, even great, literature.

Prerequisite(s): WDC: FA-110 or LA-230 completed; HUM-150 completed; CM 112/125 completed. WEC: LA 222 or LA 223 compl. Preference given to students required to take this course if enrollment exceeds limit.

EN-251 Introduction to Creative Writing (4 credits)

An astonishing offshoot of the digital age is that everyone is a writer. This general education course offers students the opportunity to become more self-aware about their written expression. Students will learn the basics of a variety of literary genres as a means of giving form to their ideas and will experiment with writing poetry, fiction, non-fiction, and children's stories. As peer readers of each other's work, they will learn in a workshop setting and hone editing and revising skills. Because all good writers are readers of others' works, students will read and do critical analyses of a variety of short literary works. This course will assist students to exercise their creativity, develop sensitivity to language choices, and identify traits of their personal writing style and literary preferences.

Prerequisite(s): FA-110 or LA-230 completed; HUM-150 completed; CM-125 completed.

EN-252 Fiction Into Film (4 credits)

The student reads works of literature and views film adaptions of them, comparing the ways that authors and directors tell stories, make meaning, and elicit audience response. She is introduced to film theory and develops her understanding of literary theory. She analyzes the literary and film texts through a variety of critical frameworks. She considers definitions of genre as she views adaptations of a wide variety of genres: the short story, children's literature, drama,the novel, and intellectual autobiography. In addition, exploring two visions of the same story deepens her understanding of the relationship between genre and the expression of human experience.

Prerequisite(s): FA-110 or LA-230 completed; HUM-150 completed; CM-125 completed. or LA 222 or LA 223 completed. Preference given to students required to take this course if enrollment exceeds limit.

EN-297 Independent Study (0 credits)

Under the approval and direction of a faculty member, independent study is available to students.

EN-310 Life Love Literature/Making Choices (2 credits)

This course allows the student to play the role of literary critic, taking risks and accepting responsibility for critical choices. She analyzes the relationship between the reader and the literary text, asking questions about form and content of a work of literature, about her responses to it, about its value as a work of literature, and about what literature itself can or should be. She develops her skills as a reader by learning major frameworks of literary criticism.

Prerequisite(s): One Communication Level 3 ICM completed; one HFA-210 completed OR LA 222 or LA 223 completed. Preference given to students required to take this course if enrollment exceeds limit.

EN-330 Imagination & Identity in Literary Stds (4 credits)

Offered Spring Term only. This course is designed to engage the student in the complex processes of reading and interpreting literature, to heighten her ability to discover meaning from a varitey of literary works and genres, and to deepen her commitment to literary studies as a chosen discipline. The course not only prepares the student for participation in the discipline of literary studies, but it also equips her with the analytical frameworks and the intellectual habits of mind necessary to remain an engaged reader and passionate critic in her personal and professional lives. She examines the nature of being a reader of literature, explores the philosophical underpinnings of literary studies, and thinks deeply and communicates clearly about a variety of complex literary works and genres within their historical, cultural, and biographical contexts. The course also uses the Diagnostic Digital Portfolio (DDP) as a significant assessment tool. The DDP is the primary tool for self-assessment in this course, a process that the student continues as she moves forward in her more advanced English courses, and which culminates in a celebratory self-assessment experience in EN-430. Using the DDP, the student maintains a creative and critical list of works she has read and would like to read so she can be more fully prepared for the literary challenges of her personal and professional lives.

Prerequisite(s): For English & ELA Majors & Support Area only. EN-250, EN-251, EN-252, EN-310, EN 311 or TA-310 completed. CM-225 completed. EN & ELA Majors take concurrent with EN-399.

EN-340 Eng Grammar: Understng Form & Function (3 credits)

This series of courses is for students interested in developing as writers and for students preparing to teach at the middle and secondary school levels. Courses include Creative Writing, Understanding English Grammar: Form and Fiction, and Facts and Features: Journalism Theory and Practice. In this series, the student studies a variety of rhetorical forms and styles, focusing on increasingly complex patterns of language and structure in literature and nonfiction. She also learns and practices a variety of forms and styles of creative and nonfiction writing.

Prerequisite(s): Required for ELA Majors & Supports. One Communication Level 4 ICM completed. Other information: Summer 2017: This course is a hybrid course with on-campus meetings and online meetings. On campus meetings are June 5 & 19, July 10 & 17

EN-343 Creative Writing II (3 credits)

This course deals with all forms of creative writing: fiction, poetry, humorous essays, journals. The student is encouraged to experiment with a wide range of genres for a variety of audiences. In the process she works to develop a sense of her own unique voice and style as a writer.

Prerequisite(s): One Communication Level 4 ICM completed. EN-251 recommended for CSW supports.

EN-344 Great Films (3 credits)

This course will address the topics of film genre and film history from a case study approach. Students will learn about film history, including technical innovation and critical reception, by studying certain key films that have been deemed "great." Explorations of these films will include analysis of film elements and a consideration of film history and criticism and Hollywood genre studies, including an examination of the Historical Epic, the Independent Film, film noir, the Western, and the Romance. Students will construct their own critical framework for "greatness" and analyze these films from a number of different theoretical or critical perspectives including, of course, their own evolving personal responses. The final individual and group project will involve a consideration of a recent "updated" version of a specific Hollywood genre with an understanding of genre conventions, revision, homage, parody, and experimentation. For example: analyzing Unforgiven (1992) or Django Unchained (2012) in light of the conventions of the Western. All films will be seen in class.

Prerequisite(s): One Communication Level 4 ICM completed.

EN-362 Reading & Writing Memoir (3 credits)

Students explore this genre by reading a variety of literary memoirs and by experimenting with their own autobiographical writing. They reflect philosophically on what creates meaning in their lives by interpreting and constructing life stories. Questions of identity, memory, truth(s), creativity, and legacy are the heart of the course. Awareness of metaphor and application of formalist, reader response, feminist, psychoanalytical, and ethnic literary approaches enhance students? ability to respond to contemporary and historical texts. Faculty and peer feedback guide students? revisions of their narratives, sharpening their sensitivity to language and other aspects of the form and content of memoir.

Prerequisite(s): One Communication Level 4 ICM completed.

EN-367 The Art of the Mystery (3 credits)

Courses in this series explore how and why we categorize literature by types, including testing out the boundaries of familiar classifications in fiction or nonfiction writing, such as poetry or autobiography. Courses include the Contemporary Novel and Autobiography. The student reads historical and contemporary works typically associated with a genre in order to infer characteristics of the type. She compares her experience as a reader with theoretical and applied articles about that type of literature, and builds her own analytical framework to represent the components of the genre being studied. She refines her understanding of a particular genre and expands her understanding of how it has been constructed by professional critics. Her creative writing experiments complement the analytical assignments in the course, providing another way to understand a genre and her own responses to it.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 4 ICM completed.

EN-371 The 20S in American Literature (3 credits)

This course examines the literary achievement of the Harlem Renaissance and Americans abroad. While evidence of the angst and artistic experimentation associated with modernism can be found in both literary movements, African-American writers of the Harlem Renaissance differed from Americans in Europe in their desire to draw from their distinctive historical and cultural traditions as a means of affirmation and empowerment. The student uses critical frameworks to analyze, evaluate, and place in context the literary works she studies. She also analyzes how the ideas, aesthetic principles, and values of the literary works challenge or reinforce her own values and thinking about life and art.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 4 ICM completed.

EN-375 African-American Literature (3 credits)

This course considers the historical roots and development of the African-American literary tradition - and its continuing impact on literature and society today. The student explores key concepts and metaphors that define African-American literature, using historical, ethnic, and feminist critical frameworks to analyze and repond to literature as an expression of and commentary on culture. She reflects on how the values and aesthetic principles of the African-American literary tradition challenge or reinforce her own thinking about art and society through creative and critical writing.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 4 ICM completed.

EN-378 The Heroine in Literature (3 credits)

This course focuses on how artists and thinkers from various cultures have conceived of the heroine, a term that is used not only in the literary sense but in terms of religious images, philosophy, the visual arts, etc. It will raise questions such as the "ideal woman" vs. the "real"; stereotyping; women's vs. men's creation of heroines; and how the image of the heroine varies from culture to culture. Frameworks from aesthetic response are particularly relevant, as are the indepth study of values and how they are challenged or affirmed by aesthetic works.

Prerequisite(s): One Communication Level 4 ICM completed.

EN-381 Major Figures: Shakespeare & Cont Wrld (3 credits)

This series, which includes a course on Shakespeare, provides the student the opportunity to develop ways of making an author's works increasingly meaningful for herself. She wrestles with questions to determine why an author such as Shakespeare stays alive as a recognized part of contemporary life, what we can learn about historical process from studying the data about an author, and how an author's work represents a multifaceted integration of literary techniques, artistic traditions, cultural values, and unique characteristics of a society.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 4 ICM completed.

EN-382 Major Figures: Early Amer Literature (3 credits)

This series, which includes a course on Shakespeare, provides the student the opportunity to develop ways of making an author's works increasingly meaningful for herself. She wrestles with questions to determine why an author such as Shakespeare stays alive as a recognized part of contemporary life, what we can learn about historical process from studying the data about an author, and how an author's work represents a multifaceted integration of literary techniques, artistic traditions, cultural values, and unique characteristics of a society.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 4 ICM completed.

EN-397 Independent Study (2 credits)

Under the approval and direction of a faculty member, independent study is available to students.

EN-398 Film Around the World (3 credits)

In this introduction to formal film studies, the student analyzes the narrative structure and visual elements of film, studying films from India, Japan, Europe, Africa, and South America as well as from the United States. She independently applies theories and frameworks from the humanities to organize and articulate her aesthetic responses to those films, and articulates her own personal vision of the genre of film.

Prerequisite(s): One Communication Level 4 ICM completed.

EN-399 Formal Introduction to Advanced Work (0 credits)

The Advanced-Level Event marks a significant accomplishment for each student as she proceeds into the work of her major department. When a department determines that a student is ready for advanced work within a discipline, the student is invited to participate in a ceremony that is both a celebration and an explanation of future requirements of the major and support areas. She registers for this experience at a point determined by her major department: for most majors the registration is connected to the taking of a particular course. Students and faculty gather for an afternoon during Mid-semester Assessment Days. Following a general program, students meet in departmental sessions with their faculty to discuss advanced outcomes, department courses, advising procedures, and so on.

Prerequisite(s): English & ELA Majors only. Concurrent registration with EN-330.

EN-430 External Assessment for Majors (1 credit)

This external assessment allows the student to evaluate and synthesize her learning in her intermediate and advanced English courses and her continuing work on her electronic individualized reading lists. She develops an English portfolio that highlights her development as a writer, reader, and scholar of literature. She prepares a formal presentation of her portfolio for the English Department. This assessment also includes a roundtable discussion of a contemporary novel, during which the student independently applies the critical frameworks she has learned in her academic program.

Prerequisite(s): For EN & ELA Majors only; EN-330 completed; take in second to last semester of program.

EN-453 From Printout to Publication (4 credits)

This course is the capstone for the Creative Studies in Writing support. The course is organized around the writing, layout and production of Alverno College's literary magazine (currently Inside/Out). Students will conceptualize the magazine's focus, write, critique and edit content in order to publish a digital literary magazine. Students will practice the concepts and skills they have developed across their program of study, including the close-reading and reviewing of professional texts and adapting a creative piece from their own portfolio for submission to the magazine. As part of this course, students will also explore the changing nature of publishing as a profession as well as a goal for their work. Students from other disciplines in the college may take the course with permission from the instructor, and may produce work for the magazine that is not text-based (e.g. art, video, podcasts).

Prerequisite(s): EN-251 & EN-343 completed or consent of instructor.

EN-463 Romantic Poetry (4 credits)

This series, which includes a course on the 19th-century novel, allows the student to explore a genre by focusing on its origins, both cultural and literacy. She examines the historical and cultural influences that contributed to the development of a genre, such as the religious climate, economics, education, and other contexts. Consideration of literacy influences on genre encourages the student to explore definitions and functions of genre. She also analyzes ways that literacy forms convey philosophical stances on what it means to be human and examines the relationship between literacy form and her own aesthetic preferences.

Prerequisite(s): One Communication Level 4 ICM completed., EN-330 completed or concurrent registration.

EN-464 The American Novel (4 credits)

This series, which includes a course on the 19th-century novel, allows the student to explore a genre by focusing on its origins, both cultural and literacy. She examines the historical and cultural influences that contributed to the development of a genre, such as the religious climate, economics, education, and other contexts. Consideration of literacy influences on genre encourages the student to explore definitions and functions of genre. She also analyzes ways that literacy forms convey philosophical stances on what it means to be human and examines the relationship between literacy form and her own aesthetic preferences.

Prerequisite(s): EN-330 completed

EN-471 Issues in Criticism: Modernism (4 credits)

Courses in this series, which includes British modernism, explore why we value certain literary authors and their works. The courses raise questions about who establishes critical standards and under what circumstances they are challenged or changed. Featured in this series are literary periods, such as modernism, in which questions about the nature and function of literature are central and during which creative writers also play a critical role. The student hones her own critical skills, including raising and evaluating her own and others' critical questions, reading literary criticism, and writing critical responses. Questions about the value of "difficult" writers, changing historical reputations of writers, the lasting impact of historical writers on contemporary literature and literary criticism, and the relationship of literature and other arts shape some of the subject matter of the course.

Prerequisite(s): EN-330 completed or concurrent

EN-472 Contemporary American Literature (4 credits)

Courses in this series, which includes British modernism, explore why we value certain literary authors and their works. The courses raise questions about who establishes critical standards and under what circumstances they are challenged or changed. Featured in this series are literary periods, such as modernism, in which questions about the nature and function of literature are central and during which creative writers also play a critical role. The student hones her own critical skills, including raising and evaluating her own and others' critical questions, reading literary criticism, and writing critical responses. Questions about the value of "difficult" writers, changing historical reputations of writers, the lasting impact of historical writers on contemporary literature and literary criticism, and the relationship of literature and other arts shape some of the subject matter of the course.

Prerequisite(s): EN-330 completed.

EN-480 Later American Literature (4 credits)

Topics change from semester to semester, but all courses in this series deal with some aspect of international literature. Through reading literature from different cultures, the student experiences a global sense of literature that puts her education in American and English literature into a wider context. While certain courses may focus on a canonical survey approach (by investigating literature from the ancient, medieval, and contemporary worlds), others may focus on the contemporary novel in Africa, Japan, China, India, and South America. Regardless of the particular approach, such as eclectic exploration allows the student to expand her investigation of how culture influences genre, meaning, and literary technique. It also allows her to strengthen her advanced-level abilities in communication, analysis, aesthetic engagement, and valuing in a global arena.

Prerequisite(s): EN-250, EN-310 or E- 311 completed. One Communication Level 4 ICM completed.

EN-482 World Literature (4 credits)

Topics change from semester to semester, but all courses in this series deal with some aspect of international literature. Through reading literature from different cultures, the student experiences a global sense of literature that puts her education in American and English literature into a wider context. While certain courses may focus on a canonical survey approach (by investigating literature from the ancient, medieval, and contemporary worlds), others may focus on the contemporary novel in Africa, Japan, China, India, and South America. Regardless of the particular approach, such an eclectic exploration allows the student to expand her investigation of how culture influences genre, meaning, and literary technique. It also allows her to strengthen her advanced-level abilities in communication, analysis, aesthetic engagement, and valuing in a global arena.

Prerequisite(s): One Communication Level 4 ICM completed.

EN-483 Advanced Internship Seminar (2 credits)

Based on her personal, academic, and professional goals and interests, the student does individual fieldwork at a job setting related to art and art applications. Her placement may involve planning and mounting exhibitions at an art museum, helping to maintain the permanent collection at a public museum, or learning the casting process in a foundry. An on-campus interdisciplinary seminar accompanies the internship, and helps her develop her professional abilities and effectively transfer classroom skills to the working world.

Prerequisite(s): Departmental consent, confer with advisor. Contact Internship Office for details and placement assistance.

EN-497 Independent Study (2 credits)

Under the approval and direction of a faculty member, independent study is available to students.