History (HS)

HS-211 Studies in US Culture & Society (2 credits)

In this course the student examines the relationships among human behavior, cultural expressions, and the social environment during a specific era of U.S. history. Emphasis is placed on the student critically analyzing historical monographs, historical documents, cultural artifacts, and artistic works to construct and effectively communicate her own understanding and interpretation of aspects of U.S. history. The student examines how U.S. society and culture at a specific time in history shaped, and was informed by, the individuals living at that time. She also analyzes and responds to artistic expressions to expand her understanding of an era of U.S. history.

Prerequisite(s): FA-110 or LA-230 completed; HUM-150 completed; CM-125 completed. OR LA 222 or LA 223 compl. Preference given to students required to take this course if enrollment exceeds limit.

HS-212 Studies in European Culture & Society (2 credits)

In this course the student examines the relationships among human behavior, cultural expressions, and the social environment during a specific era of European history. Emphasis is placed on the student critically analyzing historical monographs, historical documents, cultural artifacts, and artistic works to construct and effectively communicate her own understanding and interpretation of aspects of European history. The student examines how a European society and culture as a specific time in history shaped, and was informed by, the individuals living at that time. She also analyzes and responds to artistic expressions to expand her understanding of an era of European history.

Prerequisite(s): FA-110 & AH 150 completed; IN 130 or CM 112 completed. Satisfies Wisconsin DPI certification requirements for HS Majors & Supports. Preference will be given to Major and Support area students required to take this course if enrollment exceeds limit.

HS-213 U S. Women's Rights & Lives (2 credits)

This course covers the history of women in the United States from 1776 to the present. It holds as an assumption that while events in American history shaped the lives of women, they did so in ways that were noticeably different compared to men. The course highlights the essential role that women played in society and politics, with the assumption that women from all races, ethnicities, and socioeconomic backgrounds played profound roles in the shaping of American history. Moreover, the student considers the ways in which "woman": has been defined and debated. This rigorous analysis of history allows the student multiple opportunities to refine her analytic, valuing, aesthetic, and communication abilities through the evaluation of historical sources.

Prerequisite(s): FA-110 or LA-230 completed; HUM-150 completed; CM-125 completed. OR LA 222 or LA 223 completed. Preference given to students required to take this course if enrollment exceeds limit.

HS-250 Ancient World Cultures & Civilizations (4 credits)

This course will provide students with a chronological and thematic approach to world history from prehistoric times to 1500 C.E. By examining the first civilizations more than five thousand years ago as well as succeeding civilizations, students will learn that many of the institutions, practices, and beliefs of their own society today are not universal and unchanging, but were devised gradually to meet particular needs. A sense of how the world happened to evolve, and particularly how different cultures of the world took different approaches to understanding and dealing with the common problems of living, will help students temper their assumptions about the universality and inevitability of their lives today.

Prerequisite(s): FA-110 or LA-230 completed; HUM-150 completed; CM-125 completed. OR LA 222 or LA 223 completed. Preference given to students req to take this course if enrollment exceeds limit.

HS-251 Making of the Modern World (4 credits)

This course provides the student with a chronological and thematic approach to world history since the mid 18th century. She examines varied perspectives on individual, social, economic, and political life through an analysis of human thought, belief, and behavior. She learns how people from a variety of cultures and nation-states have shaped and responded to common challenges, developments, and events in the past and uses that historical understanding to increase her understanding of the contemporary world.

Prerequisite(s): FA-110 or LA-230 completed; HUM-150 completed; CM-125 completed. OR LA 222 or LA 223 completed. Preference given to students req to take this course if enrollment exceeds limit.

HS-297 Independent Study (0 credits)

Under the approval and direction of a faculty member, independent study is available to students.

HS-308 US History 1607-1900 (4 credits)

In a chronological overview of American history from colonial times to 1900, the student examines a number of important themes and topics in the growth of the United States. Concentration is on the social and intellectual development of the contemporary United States. Fulfills the Wisconsin requirement for all levels of teacher licensure.

Prerequisite(s): FA-110 or LA-230 completed; HUM-150 completed; CM-125 completed.

HS-309 US in 20th Century (4 credits)

This course is a survey of 20th-century America with particular emphasis on the maturation of an urban/industrial society, the impact of race and ethnicity, the changing nature of American democracy, and the rise of the United States as a world power. Fulfills the Wisconsin requirement for all levels of teacher licensure.

Prerequisite(s): FA-110 or LA-230 & HUM-150 completed; CM-125 completed.

HS-310 Ideology and Creativity (2 credits)

In this course the student studies the worldview of a society or a segment of a society in relation to other worldviews. The course compares different societies, historical epochs, or points of view within a given society to encourage her to recognize that what people know to be "true" is a particular perspective of the world. This perspective may be expressed in a variety of ways: through culture, politics, art, social institutions, and humanistic works, for example. Having come to recognize and appreciate the multiple perspectives that underlie the social construction of reality in a given society, the student examines what it means to commit oneself to choices and judgments within this multiplicity.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 3 ICM completed; one course in HFA-210 elective completed. Preference given to students required to take this course if enrollment exceeds limit.

HS-312 Native American Experience (2 credits)

The student engages in a comparative study of the First People from two specific regions and time frames. She begins her study with an in-depth examination for the First People who inhabit one North American region and era, examining different cultural expressions of art and artifacts, written and oral histories, and religious ritual. The student considers ways that spirituality, mythology and a sense of place, technological change, cultural interdependence, and confrontation shape perspective and influence decision making among native people and between them and the emerging Euro-American culture. She then studies the history and contemporary lives of a second grouping of people, applying more independently the analytical tools and valuing abilities practiced in the first half, and exploring their understanding of what shapes differences and similarities between and among native people through time and place.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 3 ICM completed; one course in HFA-210 elective completed. Preference given to students required to take this course if enrollment exceeds limit.

HS-355 Critical Perspectiv on the American Past (4 credits)

Through the examination and evaluation of diverse and conflicting narratives about significant themes and issues in American history, the student enters into the critical process by which historians debate and refine our collective understanding of America's past. She reads and evaluates various historical interpretations and examines key sources that historians have used to formulate their interpretations. She is expected to communicate coherently her critical evaluations of historical works to varied audiences and begins to construct her own interpretations of the theme or period being studied. Finally, she examines how dominant historical interpretations have shaped the nations self-concept and how historians' challenges to these dominant narratives have involved them in cultural and professional conflicts. The specific focus of the course varies from year to year.

Prerequisite(s): HS-250, HS-251, HS-310 or HS 311 completed; Aesthetic Engagement Level 4 and Analysis Level 4 completed; One Communication Level 4 ICM completed.

HS-375 Historical Analysis (4 credits)

The student examines the ways in which historians use theoretical frameworks and methodologies to interpret the past. She develops the ability to judge the effectiveness of the use of theory in research and creates her own independent interpretation of the past with a conscious regard for the way her own theories and assumptions influence her interpretation of historical evidence.

Prerequisite(s): Communication Level 4 ICM completed. One of the following completed: HS-250, HS-251, HS-211, HS-212, HS-213, HS-310 or HS-312 completed.

HS-397 Independent Study (2 credits)

Under the approval and direction of a faculty member, independent study is available to students.

HS-399 Formal Introduction to Advanced Work (0 credits)

The Advanced-Level Event marks a significant accomplishment for each student as she proceeds into the work of her major department. When a department determines that a student is ready for advanced work within a discipline, the student is invited to participate in a ceremony that is both a celebration and an explanation of future requirements of the major and support areas. She registers for this experience at a point determined by her major department: for most majors the registration is connected to the taking of a particular course. Students and faculty gather for an afternoon during Mid-semester Assessment Days. Following a general program, students meet in departmental sessions with their faculty to discuss advanced outcomes, department courses, advising procedures, and so on.

HS-411 Topics in American History (4 credits)

Each course concentrates on a variety of themes, periods, or concepts within the broad category of the title. Specific content varies from semester to semester.

Prerequisite(s): For HS Majors only; completion of HS-451, HS-355 or HS-375. Student must discuss topic ideas with Department Chair before registration is completed.

HS-412 Topics in European History (4 credits)

Each course concentrates on a variety of themes, periods, or concepts within the broad category of the title. Specific content varies from semester to semester.

Prerequisite(s): For HS Majors only; completion of HS-451, 355 or 375. Student must discuss topic ideas with Department Chair before registration is completed.

HS-413 Topics in World History (4 credits)

Each course concentrates on a variety of themes, periods, or concepts within the broad category of the title. Specific content varies from semester to semester.

Prerequisite(s): For HS Majors only; completion of HS-451, 355 or 375. Student must discuss topic ideas with Department Chair before registration is completed.

HS-451 Crit Prsp/Early Modern World, 1350-1750 (4 credits)

By evaluating diverse and conflicting approaches to early modern world history, the student studies the historical debates that inform our collective understanding of the past. She reads, relates, and evaluates various historical interpretations and also examines key sources that historians have used to formulate their interpretations. The student examines how dominant historical interpretations shape our understanding of early modern global history and how historians' new approaches to this field have led to significant reinterpretation of this period. She formulates critical evaluations of historical works and begins to construct her interpretation of the period.

Prerequisite(s): For HS Major/Supports or WGS Major/Supports: completion of Communication Level 4 ICM.

HS-475 Independent Research (4 credits)

Based on her study of historical analysis, the student indentifies and defines a problem of meaning and interest to herself as a historian and, with the direction of the history faculty, develps a research plan. She must develop theoretical frameworks, conduct the research, and present the results to the faculty in an appropriate format.

Prerequisite(s): For HS Majors only; completion of HS-451, HS-355 or HS-375. Student must discuss topic ideas with Department Chair before registration is completed.

HS-483 Advanced Internship Seminar (2 credits)

Based on her personal, academic, and professional goals and interests, the student does individual fieldwork at a job setting related to art and art applications. Her placement may involve planning and mounting exhibitions at an art museum, helping to maintain the permanent collection at a public museum, or learning the casting process in a foundry. An on-campus interdisciplinary seminar accompanies the internship, and helps her develop her professional abilities and effectively transfer classroom skills to the working world.

Prerequisite(s): Departmental consent, confer with advisor. Contact Internship Office for details and placement assistance.

HS-497 Independent Study (1-2 credits)

Under the approval and direction of a faculty member, independent study is available to students.