First Semester Seminar (FSS)

FSS-125 First Semester Seminar (2 credits)

FSS-125 introduces beginning students to academic studies through an engaging instructor-chosen topic. Students would get a first look at what it means to study an academic subject through reading, viewing, and engaging with faculty, staff, and other students. In addition to learning college-level academic skills, students would also learn strategies for being a successful college student, including practicing time-management skills, communicating effectively with faculty, and using college resources, such as the Library and the CRC, and college technology, such as Moodle and LiveText. This course would also include the students' first careering experience, through taking the Strong Interest Inventory and doing research on the Bureau of Labor Statistics Website. The Social Interaction Level 1 external assessment would be facilitated by this course.

FSS-125A American Girls' Daily Lives (2 credits)

En esta clase el estudiante practicara habilidades de nivel universitario a traves del tema "La vida de una joven adulta americana". JOvenes en su ambito familiar, jovenes como trabajadoras, como consumidoras de musica, peliculas y tecnologia.... Exploraremos la vida diaria de las jovenes entre 1960 a 1990 y las vamos a comparar con la vida diaria de una joven del siglo XXI a traves de lectura de articulos, vision de videos, musica o peliculas. Ademas, los estudiantes aprenderan la estrategias necesarias para ser un estudiante de exito en la universidad, por ejemplo, manejo del tiempo de trabajo, comunicarse eficazmente con profesores, utilizacion de todos los recursos y materiales que tiene a disposici6n del estudiante la universidad (la biblioteca, CRC, tutores, enfermeras, tecnologia..) Este curso incluye la primera experiencia profesional dentro de la universidad a traves de Strong Interest Inventory y el Bureau of Labor Statistics Website. Igualmente, el examen externo Social Interaction Level es parte de este curso. The daily life of an American Girl: Practice college-level academic skills through the theme "The daily life of an American girl. Girls in their families life, girls as a worker, as a consumer of music, movies, technologies... We will explore the daily life of the girls from 1960 to 1990 and we are going to compare with the daily life of the girls in 2018 through reading, videos and music. In addition to learning college-level academic skills, you will also learn strategies for being a successful college student, including practicing time-management skills, communicating effectively with faculty, and using college resources, such as the Library and the CRC, and college technology, such as Moodie and LiveText. This course will include your first college careering experience, through taking the Strong Interest Inventory and doing research on the Bureau of Labor Statistics Website. The Social Interaction Level 1 external assessment is part of this course.

Prerequisite(s): Bilingual Spanish and English section.

FSS-125B Mindfullness Strategies (2 credits)

In our busy day-to-day lives, we are sometimes challenged to balance all our responsibilities. This can lead to occasional anxiety and stress. What might our lives be like if we could find ways to slow down, relax into the present moment, and cultivate a greater sense of inner calm? In this section of FSS-125, we will explore ways to use mindfulness strategies to discover more effective ways to balance our daily responsibilities, ...and find joy along the way!

FSS-125C Rise Up: Women in Leadership (2 credits)

Every day we make choices. What should I eat? How much time should I use for fun, for work, for exercise, for sleep? Should I buy this? The list goes on, and the sum of these choices add up to our lifestyle. One criteria we might use to make our choices is sustainability, but how do we know what is and isn't sustainable? Sustainability is not easily described because it can be looked at from many different perspectives including; energy, money, resources, time, or even community. This class will look at both personal and community issues, and evaluate how we may choose to be more or less sustainable, and why we make these choices.

FSS-125D Women in Graphic Novels (2 credits)

Does science lead to justice? In this section of the First-Semester Seminar, we will learn and practice college-level academic skills through the theme of issues in forensic science. What constitutes valid evidence for criminal investigations? How are various types of evidence collected and interpreted by law enforcement and the judicial system? When has evidence been misused? You will get a chance to work with some basic forensic techniques. We will read a book on forensic science and various articles about specific controversies, such the use of DNA data from a genealogy company to capture the Golden State Killer. Some material may be disturbing.

Prerequisite(s): Course open to CAE students invited by faculty only.

FSS-125E Surviving the ZombieApocalypse (2 credits)

In the movies, we notice actors taking on many characters. Have you noticed how many women in science fiction movies have leadership roles or a role that is not secondary? Let's take a look at some science fiction movies, starting with the first ever science fiction movie - and classic - A Trip to the Moon, by Georges Melies in 1902. We will move onward in time to movies being produced today. What do these roles say about women of the time? What skills and abilities did women reflect in the working world? Were women into science? Did women appear to be as educated as their male counterparts? Did and do science fiction movies do justice to gender equality? What do these science fiction movies say to you? We will watch snip-its from several science fiction movies over the course of time, and analyze how women were and are portrayed. We will look at what appeared to be their role, based on their gender, and class, and how women in science fiction movies impact you today. You will learn college-level research skills, time-management skills, and effective communication skills.

FSS-125F Gender in Comic Books (2 credits)

Romantic Comedy movies are enduringly popular. In this class we will watch several famous romantic comedies and analyze their depictions of love, relationships, gender roles, ethnicity, class, and, of course, your personal responses. Researching the films and reading film reviews will also be part of our analysis.

Prerequisite(s): Course open to CAE students invited by faculty only.

FSS-125G CSI: Crime Science Issues (2 credits)

Students will explore issues related to personal finance. Topics will include budgets, taxes, credit cards, car loans, student loans, insurance, and other topics of interest raised by the students. Students will also look at the wider implications of some of these topics.

Prerequisite(s): Section only open to CAE students invited by faculty.

FSS-125H Children's Lit: Tough Topics (2 credits)

In this section of the First-Semester Seminar, we will learn and practice college-level academic skills through the theme of Tough Topics in Children's Literature. From its earliest forms, children's literature has introduced young readers to issues related to death and dying, poverty, racism and bigotry, and sexuality. We will read several children's books, exploring these themes and reflecting on broader issues related to child development and education.

Prerequisite(s): Course open to AAS students only.

FSS-125I Nature's Dilemmas (2 credits)

Take time to think about how you connect with the world around you. Whether you love lakes, trees, and wildflowers or prefer the comforts of life indoors, you depend on countless resources from nature. Using those resources creates choices you make every day. You will reflect on personal decisions and respond to readings, speakers, and field trips. You will also research how the needs of your community and larger social and economic forces affect your ability to connect to nature, both individually and in your future career.

Prerequisite(s): Section only open to CAE students invited by faculty.

FSS-125J Global Travel & Tourism (2 credits)

This class has as its focus global travel and tourism. It is designed to introduce you to the importance of tourism as an industry and to travel as a means of personal growth. We will also wrestle with some ethical issues associated with travel. If travel and tourism are done improperly they can produce considerable environmental damage, destruction of cultural heritage, economic dislocation and exploitation. We will also examine some of the logistical challenges of planning a trip.

Prerequisite(s): Course open to CAE students invited by faculty only.

FSS-125K Romantic Comedies: Love & Gender (2 credits)

Romantic Comedy movies are enduringly popular. In this class we will watch several famous romantic comedies and analyze their depictions of love, relationships, gender roles, ethnicity, class, and, of course, your personal responses. Researching the films and reading film reviews will also be part of our analysis.

FSS-125L First Semester Seminar (2 credits)

FSS-125 introduces beginning students to academic studies through an engaging instructor-chosen topic. Students would get a first look at what it means to study an academic subject through reading, viewing, and engaging with faculty, staff, and other students. In addition to learning college-level academic skills, students would also learn strategies for being a successful college student, including practicing time-management skills, communicating effectively with faculty, and using college resources, such as the Library and the CRC, and college technology, such as Moodle and LiveText. This course would also include the students' first careering experience, through taking the Strong Interest Inventory and doing research on the Bureau of Labor Statistics Website. The Social Interaction Level 1 external assessment would be facilitated by this course.

Prerequisite(s): Section only open to students invited by faculty.

FSS-125M First Semester Seminar (2 credits)

FSS-125 introduces beginning students to academic studies through an engaging instructor-chosen topic. Students would get a first look at what it means to study an academic subject through reading, viewing, and engaging with faculty, staff, and other students. In addition to learning college-level academic skills, students would also learn strategies for being a successful college student, including practicing time-management skills, communicating effectively with faculty, and using college resources, such as the Library and the CRC, and college technology, such as Moodle and LiveText. This course would also include the students' first careering experience, through taking the Strong Interest Inventory and doing research on the Bureau of Labor Statistics Website. The Social Interaction Level 1 external assessment would be facilitated by this course.

Prerequisite(s): Section only open to students invited by faculty.